Tag Archives: Input

Queer, Anarchism and Feminism

Today an event with the topic “Queer, Anarchism and Feminism” will take place.
An activist of crimethinc. will prepare an input and after that we will have a discussion.

The event will be in English.
7:15pm @AZ Conni

We live in a strange moment in the history of gender oppression.
Same-sex marriage is becoming legal in more and more countries, while restrictions on abortion and women’s reproductive autonomy are getting worse. Transgender people have become more visible than ever in the mass media, yet gender does not seem to be any less entrenched as a system of
domination in daily life. Why are all things gay and even transgender “trending”, while feminism continues to be marginalized? Could the logic of “diversity” and “inclusion,” particularly when applied to gay and transgender people in the global north, actually reinforce a repressive neoliberal agenda? How do radical queer/feminist concepts like sex positivity, polyamory, and challenging the gender binary relate to
neoliberal capitalism? And most importantly, what does collective resistance to gender oppression look like in the era of gay marriage and trans celebrities? Join a queer anarchist and feminist from the USA for provocative reflections on the politics of gender and sexuality today.

“We’re far worse than we thought we are, we’re shocked by ourselves”

Thoughts on feminist militancy

What’s that shit with women* apparently being either peaceful or bitchy? How are femininity and aggression interconnected? How can we overcome – in our political practice – the friendliness/smile we were taught? What does militancy mean to us, what can feminist militancy be? Definitely more than a mixture of feminist slogans and things guys are doing at demonstrations. How should our “our” militancy look, without only taking part in already existing forms? Which examples of feminist militancy existed in the past? And now, where to go to with the anger?
Link to the video

When? 09/03/16 at 6pm (!!! time changed !!!)
Where? kosmotique, Martin-Luther-Str. 16 01099 Dresden
talks is in German

“Is Consent Sexy?” – an article by Tanya Serisier

In October 2014, while we were at the Anarchafeminist Conference in London, we visited Feminist Fightback during one of there meetings at the Common House. A lot of interesting things take place there. In the same building, you can e.g. find London’s Plan C. So we took one of their bamn magazines, in which Tanya Serisier’s article ‘Is Consent Sexy?’ was published, with us.
German (queer)feminism often combines the fight against sexual violence with the ideal of ‘consensual’ sex. We even have a banner that says ‘We love consent’ 😉 Apparently, this is the case in English-speaking contexts, as well and those debates also have an impact on ours. Serisier criticises ‘the’ concept of ‘consent’ from a feminist point of view.
Reading her article, our wish to ‘import’ such debates (this also applies to articles about safer spaces,…) grew. Perhaps this can help to stop German debates from going round in circles or getting stuck in the same discussions over and over again – which is why we translated Serisier’s article.
Translating texts is, however, quite a lot of work and often one of the first things to be left undone, when there’s a lot going on (just have a look at the things that have been going on in Dresden over the last months…). This article took us half a year. If you speak German and English (or any other languages) and are keen on helping us with translations, let us know. Anyway, here‘s the German translation and this is the English original:

Is Consent Sexy? (Tanya Serisier)

‘Consent is sexy. Sex without consent is rape.’ This slogan comes from a US-based campaign (consentissexy.org) targeted at university students and aimed at promoting a ‘culture of consent’ on university campuses. But the slogan could easily come from any number of campaigns aimed at reducing sexual violence and changing sexual behaviour. The political logic of this campaign is so commonplace in countries such as the US and the UK that it is essentially a form of ‘common sense knowledge’ or even a hegemonic truth, broadly shared across the political spectrum. This logic is, mainly speaking, that rape – defined as sexual activities that one of the parties does not consent to -is a terrible thing and should not occur. Therefore, what we need to do is promote, socially and culturally, sex that is the opposite of this illegal, harmful and unethical sex. Following from legal definitions of non-consent, consent becomes the primary criterion for judging good, ethical and even ‘sexy’ sex.

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